Product Care

ReRoot creates tools that are intended to be used. The more you use your tools, the more abuse they tend to endure. Over time, they'll continue looking and functioning their best when you take some time to take care of them. The more care you put into maintaining these tools, the longer they will last. These tools can last for generations! If not properly cared for, they'll last only a fraction of that time. Here are some care and maintenance tips for prolonging the life of the tools that we've made for you.

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Kitchen Knives:

Our kitchen knives are made from carbon tool steel. This steel will stain and eventually rust if left in prolonged contact with water, so get into the habit of keeping your steel and handles as dry as possible. Use a soft cloth to dry after use, and store your knife in a safe dry place - such as on magnetic knife holder. Small amounts of food safe oil should occasionally be wiped onto the blade. The knife handles have been stabilized, oiled with natural oils, and buffed with beeswax. If the handle dries out from washing, simply rub more oil into the handle, let it soak,, wipe off excess oil, then buff in some beeswax.

*our new kitchen knife handles are protected with a Cyanoacrylite finish, which won’t need to be oiled as long as there aren’t any deep scratches in the surface.

 

Camp/Bushcraft Knives:

Our camp and bushcraft knives are made from carbon tool steel. This steel will stain and rust if left in prolonged contact with water. Keep your steel and wooden handles dry. Dry your knives after using them and make sure the leather sheath doesn't get soaked through with water. Dry it in the sun if it does. Small amounts of oil should be worked into metal and wood from time to time. Buffing beeswax into the wood afterwards will protect it even more. The leather sheath can be oiled and waxed.

*If storing for a long period of time, we would recommend taking the knife out of the sheath.

*our new camp knife handles are protected with a Cyanoacrylite finish, which won’t need to be oiled as long as there aren’t any deep scratches in the surface.

 

Chopsticks/ Wooden utensils:

Do not let wood soak in water. If utensils begins to dry out, treat wood with food safe mineral oil, let dry, then wipe off excess. Repeat until wood won’t absorb any more oil. Finish with a beeswax/oil blend.

 

Arrowheads/Spearpoints:

Keep steel as dry as possible, and treat steel occasionally with mineral oil and wipe off excess. Leather sheath can be oiled and waxed.

 

Firestarters:

Occasionally work oil and beeswax into cedar handle. Natural oils from your hands will also help. Replenish your supply of birch bark or tinder as you burn through it. If striker edges dull, simply sharpen the flat outer edge so you have a sharp 90 degree corner again.

 

Ceramic knife-sharpeners:

Occasionally work oil and beeswax into handle. Clean ceramic rod with warm water and wipe off metal deposits. Occasionally work oils into ceramic rod. Take extra care not to drop your ceramic rod - this material can chip and break.